Recipe Share: Crack Slaw

Have you ever had “crack slaw?” Oh my! It is so amazingly delicious and addictive (hence it’s name, I suppose) and EASY. I’ve tried a number of different recipes and some are better than others. I’ve tried versions that incorporate brown rice and others that just use plain old shredded cole slaw mix. This recipe is my own and it has been crowned by my teenage son as his new favorite meal, surpassing his previous fave, honey-soy salmon. I left out the brown rice and replaced the cole slaw mix with broccoli slaw. I’ll warn you though, if you make this, whip up a double batch! ūüėČ

Angie’s Crack Slaw


4 Tbsp sesame oil
4 cloves garlic, minced
1/2 yellow onion, diced
2 tsp. ginger root, grated
1/2 cup cilantro, chopped
1-2 lbs. organic, pastured ground beef
2 12-oz bags of shredded broccoli slaw
4 Tbsp soy sauce (or coconut aminos)
2 Tbsp rice vinegar
4 green onions, thinly sliced (white and green parts)
salt/pepper to taste
black sesame seeds
chili oil (optional to add some heat)


Heat sesame oil in a large wok or skillet. Stirfry garlic, onion, and ginger root for 2-3 minutes until onion is translucent being attentive so that the garlic doesn’t burn.

Add ground beef and break apart with a spatula or wooden spoon. Add cilantro and brown ground beef for 5-10 minutes until no pink remains.

Add broccoli slaw and stirfry with beef mixture for another 5 minutes.

Add soy sauce, rice vinegar, and green onions. Stir to combine.

Turn heat to low, cover, and simmer for another 3-5 minutes – broccoli slaw should be cooked to the desired tenderness.

Season with salt and pepper.

Serve in bowls, sprinkle with sesame seeds and drizzle with a small amount of chili oil (a little goes a long way) if you want it a little spicier.

Makes 4-6 servings. Enjoy!

My Favorite Vegan Recipe

As you may or may not know, Deb and I adopted a rabidly vegan nutrition philosophy from 2015 through early-2017 when we transitioned back to a more vegetarian diet with some fish and seafood thrown in occasionally. Today, we do eat beef and chicken in small amounts as long as the meat/poultry/eggs/cheese, etc. are organic and from pastured animals. I would guess that we still eat around 90% plant-based.

I found very favorite vegan recipe on Pinterest a couple of years ago and it has had a prominent place in our meal rotation ever since. This Lentil Chili from Katya at the blog, Little Broken, is simply AMAZING!¬† Rich and hearty, you’ll never miss the meat! I love to serve it over brown rice or cauliflower rice or in baked russet potatoes or baked sweet potatoes – and of course with ample sliced avocado.

If you’re not so concerned about keeping things vegan, you could add shredded cheese and sour cream too.

I hope you enjoy it as much as my family does!

Photo from All rights reserved.

Lentil Chili


2 Tbsp. olive oil or avocado oil (my choice)
1 medium yellow onion, chopped
1 large red or yellow bell pepper, chopped
5 cloves garlic, minced
1 T chili powder
1 lb bag of brown lentils
1 28 oz cans no-salt diced tomatoes (I like Muir Glen Fire Roasted Diced Tomatoes)
1 bay leaf
2 (32 oz.) cartons vegetable stock
‚Öď cup fresh chopped cilantro
sea salt and fresh ground black pepper


1. Heat oil in a large pot. Add onion and red bell pepper and saute until soft and lightly browned, stirring occasionally.
2. Stir in garlic and chili powder; cook until fragrant.
3. Add lentils, tomatoes, bay leaf, and stock. Season with salt and ground black pepper, to taste. Bring to a
boil, lower the heat to medium-low and simmer, partially covered, for 30 minutes or until lentils are
tender. Remove from the heat and discard the bay leaf.
4. Transfer 3 cups of the chili into a food processor or a blender and process until pureed; add the pureed chili back
into the remaining chili and stir to combine. Taste for salt and pepper.
5. Stir in cilantro and serve.

Makes 8 servings

Add-in suggestions:

  • spinach or kale
  • black beans

I’m Not Eating THAT!

Back in October Deb started seeing a doctor of Traditional Chinese Medicine for some digestive issues she had been experiencing for a while that we couldn’t seem to nail down the cause of. The doctor, FeiFei¬†Liu, came highly recommended by some trusted friends and Deb has always been curious about the TCM arts. Deb had actually been waiting for the better part of a year to get an appointment with her because FeiFei had been in China for 10 months studying with an aging herbal master.

FeiFei¬†described the healing process (a combination of acupuncture and herbal remedies) as a puzzle of bringing the body into balance – one organ or issue at a time. Of course, Deb and I are not incredibly patient people, but our way wasn’t working, so perhaps it was time to broaden our minds and embrace something new (or OLD to be more precise). When Deb came home from her first appointment with FeiFei she had a short list of dos and don’t – nothing crazy or extreme – and a recommendation to eat something called “Congee” for breakfast.

Now, I am always up for a new culinary experience, but when I consulted the Google and saw what Congee was, I was less than excited. Essentially, congee is rice porridge – rice cooked in water or broth until the grains essentially¬†disintegrate and it looks something like the bowls of gruel served to the orphan children in “Oliver Twist.” It really looked terrible.

Don’t get me wrong, I am NOT a picky eater. I’ll pretty much try anything. However, I have never been a big “porridge” person. I like oatmeal, but it’s always on the sweet side. I never liked Cream of Wheat or Cream of Rice when I was growing up. To be quite honest, the texture of them activated my gag reflex. And to make matters worse, most of the recipes I was finding for Congee were savory. I just couldn’t wrap my head around it and I found myself in full on resistance mode. I wanted NOTHING to do with this Congee stuff.

Deb was amused by how deep I was digging in my heels on the issue,¬†but the very thought of rice gruel made me sick to my stomach. So, I did what I do when faced with something I don’t want to deal with. I didn’t deal with it. I ignored it. When Deb would bring it up, I quickly changed the subject. This went on for weeks before I finally relented and went on a quest for a Congee recipe that I thought I might be able to stomach. This is the recipe I found and I tell you now, before God and the entire blogosphere:

I was WRONG!

This Garlic Beef and Onion Congee¬†from Food & Wine is AMAZING and has become a staple in our breakfast rotation. Don’t be as resistant as I was. Give it a try!

  • 1 cup raw long-grain white rice, rinsed
  • 7 cups chicken or vegetable stock
  • 1/2 teaspoon kosher or sea salt
  • One-inch knob of ginger, peeled and sliced thin
  • 2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
  • 1/2 medium red onion, diced
  • 4 medium cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 pound ground beef
  • 2 teaspoons soy sauce
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro

How to Make It

In large pot add stock, rice, salt and ginger. Bring the mixture to a boil, then reduce the heat to a low simmer. Stir occasionally so that the rice doesn’t clump or stick at the bottom. Simmer the congee for about 1 hour or until the congee is thickened and creamy.(NOTE: I used a slow cooker – just dump the stock, rice, salt, and ginger in the crockpot and cook on Low for ~8-10 hours – and it worked great).

While the congee is cooking, heat a large skillet on medium-high heat. Add the oil, and then stir in the onion and garlic. (NOTE: I also added about 2 tsp. of sesame oil) Cook for about 1 minute or until soft, and then stir in the beef.

Cook the beef for about 10 minutes or until browned and cooked through. Stir in the soy sauce, and then remove the skillet from the heat. Stir in the chopped cilantro.

Pour the congee in serving bowls and top with the beef mixture. Serve the congee hot.

This recipe makes 6 hearty portions. It thickens substantially when cooled (think cold oatmeal), so I added more vegetable stock to a saucepan when reheating.


Really, this is now one of my new favorite recipes! Today I am making a 3-bean version (substituting a can each of red kidney beans, black beans, and great northern beans for the ground beef). I’ll let you know how it turns out!

My New Favorite Breakfast

For the past several months, I’ve been eating the same breakfast – not because it’s on some diet plan or because I HAVE to, but because I want to. ¬†It’s freaking delicious! ¬†I got the basic method from Swim Bike Mom’s blog¬†and then tweaked it based on my own tastes. ¬†It’s a great pre-long workout meal or just a terrific, “sticks with you” breakfast in general.

Protein Quinoa Bowl

1 cup cooked quinoa
1 banana, smooshed up (technical culinary term)
1 Tbsp almond butter
1 scoop vanilla protein powder (I like Vega Protein & Greens)
3/4 tsp. cinnamon
dash nutmeg
1/2-3/4 cup unsweetened almond milk
1/2 cup fresh or frozen blueberries
Sliced almonds, optional

Mix everything but the blueberries together in a saucepan and heat until boiling (careful not to let it scorch). ¬†If using frozen blueberries, pour the hot porridge over the berries in a bowl. ¬†If using fresh berries, just sprinkle them on top. ¬†Sliced almonds are a nice finishing touch too. ¬†ūüôā

NOTE: ¬†This is really just a method more than a recipe. ¬†I’ve used brown rice, steel-cut oats, and millet and the results are just as good. ¬†Use whatever berries you like. ¬†Drizzle with honey if it’s not sweet enough for you. ¬†Use peanut butter (or other nut butter) instead of almond butter. ¬†Play with it and see what you like best! ¬†And it’s super quick if you make a big batch of quinoa in advance and then you just have to scoop it into the pan.

Hope you love it as much as I do!

Photo Credit:

Photo Credit:

What’s For Lunch?

whats-for-lunchRecalling that 2016 is the Year of #NoExcuses , I have made it my business to get my butt in shape both in the gym and in the kitchen! ¬†Breakfast, dinner, and snacks are not a big deal, but lunches often have me stumped! ¬†I am not a big sandwich eater. ¬†I don’t like the way bread makes me feel and most gluten-free breads taste like dirt. ¬†When you take meat and bread out of the mix, lunches can become a bit perplexing – especially when you also don’t want to eat salads for lunch every day of the week.

Well, I’ve come across two recipes that I dearly LOVE that I thought I’d share with you guys. ¬†The cool thing about them is that it is super easy to change the spices and create a whole new dish.

The first recipe comes from our friends at Forks Over Knives (by the way, I highly recommend this site for recipe – they also have an app that is VERY handy).

Mexican-Rice-Soup-LFedit-800x534Mexican Rice Soup



  • 1 medium onion, chopped
  • 4 cloves garlic, minced
  • 6 cups low-sodium vegetable stock
  • 1 15-ounce can kidney beans, drained and rinsed
  • 1 15-ounce can black beans drained and rinsed
  • 1 15-ounce can pinto beans drained and rinsed
  • 1 15-ounce can fire-roasted tomatoes
  • 1 tablespoon chili powder
  • 1 cup long‚Äďgrain brown rice, toasted (see note)
  • Salt to taste


  1. Place oil in a small pool in the center of a large skillet, and add garlic and onion.  Cook over medium-low heat for 4 minutes until soft.  (Again, I saute in water or broth)
  2. Add cumin, cayenne, and paprika.  Stir and cook for 1 minute to release flavors.
  3. Add diced tomatoes with liquid, water/broth, lentils, kale, and salt.  Stir and raise heat to high.  When mixture boils, reduce heat to low and cover.  Simmer for 20 minutes or until liquid is absorbed.


I omitted the cumin and cayenne and added a couple of tsps of dried italian seasoning.  It was terrific.

I think this would also be good with a curry flavor. ¬†I haven’t tried it yet, but I think it would work well.


If you’re bored with your lunch routine, give these recipes a whirl! ¬†They are delicious and so versatile! ¬†Bon appetit!

So, what’s for lunch in your neck of the woods?

Keeping It Simple…

fogMy Mom is a HUGE advocate of keeping things simple.  She has a whole shelf of books devoted to the concept of living a simple/simplified life (Sarah Ban Breathnach, anyone?) that she has read over and over again.

I get the idea and I like things clean and simple – I really do.

However, when life gets overwhelming (as it tends to do often these days) I turn into a squirrel – over here, no there, no, back over there…¬† Things get “cluttered” – literally and figuratively – my desk, my house, and most of all MY MIND!!!

And that generally doesn’t work so well since I share my life with an OCD, neat-freak.

Eventually there comes a point where I snap and I can’t stand the clutter anymore – literally and figuratively – and I clean – my desk, my house, and most of all MY MIND!!

How does one go about cleaning their mind, you ask?

Well, I imagine the “gurus” all have their techniques, but for me, I just have to stop – EVERYTHING!¬† I go to a quiet place, sit down, close my eyes, and empty my mind.¬† I repeat “Every complex problem is just a series of simple steps – keep it simple” over and over again.

It’s as if I swiffer out all the cob-webby thoughts that were cluttering up the dark corners.

Sometimes it only takes a few minutes… Sometimes it takes an hour, but I ALWAYS feel refreshed and rejuvenated when I do this exercise.¬† I come back to my very complex world and start breaking things down to simple tasks, and the overwhelm does go away – for a while. ūüėČ

Believe it or not, this post was not intended to be about my mental swiffering, but rather to share the thought that sometimes simple is just BETTER!!

Last night’s dinner was a perfect example.¬† We had steamed Old Bay Shrimp and corn on the cob and it was so, so good!¬† Nothing fancy, no recipes with 20 steps and 30 ingredients, just simple, real food.

I just wanted to share the recipe:

Steamed Old Bay Seasoned Shrimp

Steamed Old Bay Seasoned Shrimp

Steamed Old Bay Shrimp


  • 1 lb. shrimp in shells
  • 1/2 cup white vinegar
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 1 Tbsp. Old Bay seasoning


  • Bring vinegar, water, and Old Bay to a simmer in a large saucepan.¬† Add shrimp to pan.¬† Stir well.¬† Cover.¬† Shrimp should be opaque when cooked (only a few minutes).
  • Drain shrimp.¬† Peel and eat.

corn-on-the-cobCorn on the Cob


  • 4 ears of corn, shucked
  • water


  • Put corn in a stockpot and add water to cover ears by a couple of inches.
  • Bring water to a boil
  • Turn heat back to Low and allow to simmer for 10 minutes
  • Drain water, add butter, Voila!!

Recipe: Spicy Chicken-Broccoli Rice Bowl

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This “recipe” – and I use the term loosely, because it’s more of a method than an actual recipe – is quickly becoming my go-to lunch favorite.

It is super-quick, super-easy, and super-delicious.  It is also an AWESOME way to use up leftovers, which appeals to my more frugal nature, since you can throw pretty much any veggie or meat in the pan.

Today, I made a spicy chicken-broccoli brown rice bowl and, boy howdy, is it good!!! ūüôā

Spicy Chicken-Broccoli Rice Bowl


  • 2 tsp EVOO
  • 1/2 tsp chili oil
  • 1/4 cup sliced red onion
  • 4 white mushrooms, sliced
  • 1 tsp grated fresh ginger
  • 1 garlic clove, minced
  • 5 oz. cooked chicken breast, diced
  • 1 cup broccoli florets (mine were frozen but I thawed them out first)
  • 1 tbsp chopped nuts (peanuts are good, but all I had were almonds – also quite delicious)
  • 1/2 cup cooked brown rice
  • Braggs Aminos to taste


Heat EVOO and chili oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat.

Add onions, garlic, ginger, and mushrooms and saute until onions are translucent and mushrooms are cooked through.  Add chicken, broccoli, and nuts and stir fry until everything is hot.

Put rice in a bowl, spritz with a couple of pumps of Braggs Aminos, top with chicken/veggie mix, and spritz with a few more pumps of Braggs.

Enjoy!!  Makes 1 large serving, but it could easily feed 2 people for lunch.